Ten Ways to Improve Education (in Tweets)

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Two Twitter pals who post a lot of good things on education asked me, late last night, me about ten ways to change education. Here’s @catinstack’s 10 late-night tweets on ed reform (w some a.m. edits):

Three Ways of Writing for a Digital World

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Writing cursive, fast, timely? We’re in transition between old ways of communicating by text in printed books and magazine and new ways of mixing it up on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Linked In . . . What is lost? What is gained? How do we think about writing in a digital world?

Edu-Traitor! Confessions of a Prof Who Believes Higher Ed Shouldn't Be the Only Goal

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Everyone benefits from more education. No one benefits from an educational system that defines learning so narrowly that whole swaths of human intelligence, skill, talent, creativity, imagination, and accomplishment do not count. As an educator, I want to change that hierarchy of values in order to support a more abundant form of education that honors the full range of intellectual possibility and potential for everyone, regardless of whether they are college material or not.

What If We Stopped Teaching Kids What They Can't Do?

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A friend recently told me about her child’s inspiring kindergarten teacher, a brilliant woman who had spent most of her life with five-year olds. For a while, she moved up to first grade teaching but, she said, first graders already knew what they couldn’t do. “No kindergarten child says ‘I can’t draw’ or “I can’t sing.’ They think they can do anything. By first grade they already know what they are good and poor at, what they can and what they cannot do.” Think about that. Age 6 and you already have a personal score card.

Is It Dumb To Give Preschoolers Standardized Tests?

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The answer to the question in my headline title, “Is It Dumb to Give Preschoolers Standardized Tests?” is unequivocal: yes. It’s dumb. Don’t do it. Please don’t do it. It’s a false metric with false goals that simply reinforces the twentieth-century’s interminable confusion of “standards” with “standardization.” We can do so much better.

Cathy N. Davidson

Cathy N. Davidson

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